Epic’s track record of riding the correct currents makes it an interesting company to watch

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Epic’s track record of riding the correct currents makes it an interesting company to watch. This week, Google finally revealed its game-streaming service, Stadia, and it announced Unreal as a partner, alongside Unity and a slew of other major brands.

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“There are the problems we solve, and then there are the problems that the platform companies solve and we just work with them on it,” Sweeney said. We talked a day before Google actually announced Stadia, so he kept things vague. “Streaming is one of those, right? Streaming is something that’s going to require tons of billions of dollars of investment, building server farms close to users and 5G and everything else. That’s above our pay grade [Editor’s note: doubtful], but what we will do is we’ll support it with our games.”

“Streaming is something that’s going to require tons of billions of dollars of investment.”

Epic was at GDC this week to reveal its latest tools and technologies in a press conference on Wednesday morning. Developers showed off the photogrammetry capabilities of Unreal 4.21, and the ray-tracing upgrades in Unreal 4.22, which is available now in preview. The full version is due to land within two weeks. Plus, the company highlighted its prowess in fields outside of game development, partnering with film and TV company Goodbye Kansas on a cinematic inspired by fantasy artist John Bauer, and working with Quixel on a futuristic, photorealistic short based on images of Iceland.

Epic closed out its GDC showcase with free v bucks generator at the next next version of Unreal, 4.23, which is scheduled to go live in June. The Chaos system represents Epic’s latest approach to video game realism, but instead of focusing on generating more lifelike images, it’s all about physics. Chaos implements destructible environments and objects on an unprecedented scale, and better simulates rigid-body dynamics.

https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=1648494059

In the demo, a giant robot tore through buildings, cars and enemies, all of them crumbling elegantly in sprays of stone and metal. However, I wondered, would Chaos be able to make simple, human movements — the things that are apparently the hardest to recreate in video games — appear normal?

“But can it make drinking a cup of water look natural?” I asked Epic CTO Kim Libreri.

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